Tag Archives: conference

CAA 2016 Session Videos

Continuing on the video theme: awhile back we encouraged folks to attend this year’s Computer Applications in Archaeology conference in Oslo. It was a blast to attend, and Oslo is a really cool city to spend a week in. I even briefly considered staying on to start a career doing car advertisements..

carmodel

 

However, if you weren’t able to make it up to Oslo, Doug Rocks-Macqueen, author of the excellent blog Doug’s Archaeology, has you covered: his session recordings have been making their way out on to the interwebs via his YouTube channel, Recording Archaeology. Now you can relive all of the action of CAA Oslo right in your own home!

Here’s a few of the sessions, helpfully organized as playlists of individual talks:

Linked pasts: Connecting islands of content

Methodology of archaeological simulation. Meeting of the Special Interest Group in Complex Systems Simulation

The road not taken: Modelling approaches to transport on local and regional scales

Can you model that? Applications of complex systems simulation to explore the past

Networking the past: Towards best practice in archaeological network science

Theorising the Digital: Digital Theoretical Archaeology Group (digiTAG) and the CAA

Interpretations from digital sensations? Using the digital sensory turn to discover new things about the past

For more videos, check out Recording Archaeology. And don’t forget to register for CAA 2017 in Atlanta!

 

CFP: Computational Social Science Society of the Americas, Santa Fe, Nov 17-20

The CSSSA will be hosting its annual conference in November, bringing researchers from all stripes of computational social science together in beautiful Santa Fe, New Mexico. According to the website, some of the topics to be discussed at the meeting include (but are not limited to):

  • Social network analysis
  • Agent-based models / modeling
  • Emergence
  • Economic models / resource allocation
  • Population dynamics
  • Ecosystems
  • Political/social systems
  • Biological systems / metabolism / bioenergetics
  • Efficiencies / fitness functions
  • Competition / cooperation
  • Networks / information flow
  • Social contagion
  • Vision / knowledge acquisition
  • Influence
  • Swarm intelligence
  • Adaptation / evolution
  • Decision making
  • Local knowledge / global patterns
  • Game theoretic models
  • Strategy
  • Learning

Applications close August 15th, 2016. For more information, check out the CSSSA website.

Image source: Wikimedia Commons/U.S. Public Domain

CSS2016 Amsterdam

If the most important annual conference in complex systems simulation is anything to go by then researchers in humanities are slowly infiltrating the ranks of complexity scientists.

This year the CSS (Complex Systems Society) conference is taking place in Amsterdam between 19-22 September. It is structured a bit differently than traditional conferences, that is, it consists of two main parts:

  • Core sessions such as “Foundations of Complex Systems” or “Socio-ecological Systems”, which are held every year, and
  • Satellite sessions, usually focusing on smaller topics or subdisciplines, which are proposed independently and, therefore, change from one year to another.

Archaeology (and humanities in general) has been on and off the agenda since 2013 but usually this meant one dedicated session and perhaps a paper or two in the core sessions classified as social systems simulations. However, this year there seems to be a bit of an explosion (let’s call it ‘exponential growth’!) in the number of sessions led by folk who have interest in the past. These three are particularly relevant:

10. Complexity and the Human Past: Unleashing the Potential of Archaeology and Related Disciplines
Organizer: Dr. Sergi Lozano

26. Complexity History. Complexity for History and History for Complexity 
Organizer: Assoc Prof. Andrea Nanetti

27. The Anthropogenic Earth System: Modeling Social Systems, Landscapes, and Urban Dynamics as a Coupled Human+Climate System up to Planetary Scale
Organizer: Dr. John T. Murphy

In addition, there are a number of satellite sessions that, although not dealing specifically with past systems, may be of interest for anyone who deals with evolution, urban development, economic systems or networks and game theory.  Finally, the most excellent student conference on complex systems (SCCS) will run just prior to the main event, between 16-18 September.

To submit an abstract, get in touch with the session organiser (you can find their emails here). The official deadline is 10th July, but the organisers may have imposed a different schedule so get in your abstract soon. And see you all in Amsterdam!

Image above: http://www.ccs2016.org

 

 

CAA in Atlanta: 2017 dates

The Simulating Complexity team is all coming home from a successful conference in Oslo. Highlights include a 2-day workshop on agent-based modeling led by the SimComp team, a roundtable on complexity and simulation approaches in archaeology, and a full-day session on simulation approaches in archaeology.

We are all looking forward to CAA 2017 in Atlanta. Dates were announced at Oslo, so start planning.

CAA2017 will be held at Georgia State University March 13th-18th. This leaves 2 weeks before the SAAs, so we hope to have a good turnout on simulation and complexity approaches at both meetings!

CFP: Interactive Pasts conference, Leiden April 4-5 2016

People play video games, archaeologists included. People are spending more and more time in the virtual worlds presented by video games, raising the question of how our digital past is to be studied or curated. And video games are often constructed within historical frames, whether characters are fighting dysentery on the Oregon Trail or fighting mutants in a post-apocalyptic Boston. Video games offer a window into historical process and narrative-building that more passive media cannot.

There is a growing contingent of archaeologists and historians who are using and exploring video games as both media for portraying the past (or pasts), as well as a valuable source of information on the digital lives of humans in the more recent past. Greater historical detail in games also suggests a role for archaeologists in the development of games.

Enter Interactive Pasts: a conference bringing together these disparate interests. From the website:

This ARCHON-GSA conference will explore the intersections of archaeology and video games. Its aim is to bring scholars and students from archaeology, history, heritage and museum studies together with game developers and designers. The program will allow for both in-depth treatment of the topic in the form of presentations, open discussion, as well as skill transference and the establishment of new ties between academia and the creative industry.

If you’re already going to be on the road for the CAA conference in Oslo, this conference conveniently begins right afterwards in Leiden. Abstracts are due on the 31st, and more information can be found here.

Call for Papers: Computer Applications in Archaeology, Oslo, March 29 – April 2 2016

The folks at CAA have issued a call for papers for next year’s conference in Oslo. The conference theme is Exploring Oceans of Data, befitting the maritime heritage of the host city. There are a number of exciting sessions planned, including a one organised by we, your friendly neighborhood SimulatingComplexiteers:

Can You Model That? Applications of Complex Systems Simulation to Explore the Past

The large scale patterns that we commonly detect in the archaeological record are often not a simple sum of individual human interactions. Instead, they are a complex interwoven network of dependencies among individuals, groups, and the environment in which individuals live. Tools such as Agent-based Modelling, System Dynamics Models, Network Analysis and Equation-based Models are instrumental in unravelling some of this network and shedding light on the dynamic processes that occurred in the past. In this session we invite case studies using computational approaches to understand past societies. This session will showcase the innovative ways archaeologists have used simulation and other model building techniques to understand the interactions between individuals and their social and natural environments. The session will also provide a platform to discuss both the potential and the limitations of computational modelling in archaeology and to highlight the range of possible applications.

There are also a number of other amazing looking sessions. Here’s just a few:

  • Networking the past: Towards best practice in archaeological network science
  • Using GIS Modeling to Solve Real-World Archaeological Problems
  • Exploring Maritime Spaces with Digital Archaeology: Modelling navigation, seascapes, and coastal spaces
  • Analyzing Social Media & Online Culture in Archaeology
  • Modelling approaches to analyse the socio-economic context in archaeology II: defining the limits of production
  • Computational approaches to ancient urbanism: documentation, analysis and interpretation

Personally, I can’t think of a better way to spend a few days than talking computers and archaeology in lovely Oslo. For more information or to submit an abstract, visit the CAA conference website.

Considering Cultural Complexity in Agent-based Modelling, Cologne, 23-24 October 2015

Our colleagues in Cologne have put forward an interesting observation. They argue that most of the current ABMs in archaeology ignore the cultural dimension of human systems and instead treat agents behaviour in a mechanistic way. This has been a common criticism of economic models with their strong assumptions of rationality and perfect knowledge of the agents their model. However, I believe (tell me if I’m wrong), the lack of cultural complexity is raised for the first time in the context of humanities research.

If you find it an interesting food for thought, a two-day get together for researchers working on cultural complexity and agent-based modelling is organised in Cologne 23-24th October 2015 (see the event abstract below). The Call for Papers closes on 14th August. For more details see: http://abmculture.uni-koeln.de/index.html

Agent-based modeling can be used in a multitude of ways by researchers and teams with different scientific backgrounds all around the globe. With this workshop we intend to provide an opportunity to discuss the role of culture in agent-based modeling. Therefore we would like to invite to join the workshop the researchers whose work is based on the assumption that human beliefs and behavior are not caused solely by physical conditions and individual experiences but also by transmitted knowledge shaped in historical and social processes. We want culture to be understood in a broad sense, so that we can discuss a variety of concepts of culture and its current or potential use in agent-based modeling.

Image source: WikiMedia https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cologne_-_Panoramic_Image_of_the_old_town_at_dusk.jpg

The Conference on Complex Systems, Tempe, Arizona (28 Sept – 2 Oct)

This year the (European) Conference on Complex System is going global (by loosing the ‘E’) and moving to the Tempe, Arizona (28 Sept – 2 Oct). It is also the most archaeo/anthropo/history-filled edition yet. The satellite sessions include:

Complexity and Human Past: Unleashing the Potential of Archaeology and Related Disciplines

The Cultural Evolution of Technology: Evidence, Hypothesis and Theory

Evolution of Ancient Maya Society as a Complex System

Complexity History, Complexity for History and History for Complexity

Plus there is a good selection of social science focused sessions which should be of interest to archaeologists. Follow this link for more details. The abstract deadline is TODAY so get it in there asap.