Tag Archives: best practice

Should I cite?

In the old day things were simple – if you borrowed data, an idea, a method, or any specific piece of information, you knew you need to cite the source of such wisdom. With the rise of online communication these lines have become more blurred, especially in the domain of research software.

Although we use a wide variety of software to conduct our research it is not immediately obvious which of them deserve a formal citation, which should be mentioned and which can be left out completely. Imagine three researchers doing exactly the same piece of data analysis: the first one uses Excel, the second – SPSS, the third coded it up in R. The chances are that the Excel scholar won’t disclose which particular tool allowed him to calculate the p-values, the SPSS user will probably mention what they used, including the version of the software and the particular function employed, finally the R wizard is quite likely to actually cite R in the same way as they would cite a journal paper.

You may think this is not a big deal and we are talking about the fringes of science, but in fact it is. As everyone who has ever tried to replicate (or even just run) someone else’s simulation will tell you, without detailed information on software that was used, the chances of succeeding vary between  virtually impossible to very difficult. But apart from the reproducibility of research there is also the issue of credit. Some (probably most) of the software tools we are using were developed by people in research positions – as their colleagues were producing papers, they have spent their time developing code. In the world of publish or perish they may be severely disadvantaged if their effort is not credited in the same way as their colleagues. Spending two years developing a software tool that is used by hundreds of other researchers and not getting a job because the other candidate had published three conference papers in the meantime, sounds like a rough deal.

To make it easier to navigate this particular corner of academia, we teamed up with research software usurers and developers during the Software Sustainability Institute Hackday and created a simple chart and a website to help you make the decision of when to and when not to cite research software.

shoudacite_comic

If you’re still unsure check out the website we put together for more information about research software credit, including a short guide on how to get people to cite YOUR software:    Also, keep in mindt hat any model uploaded to OpenABM gets a citation and a doi, making it easy to cite.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SSI to the rescue

Ever heard of the Software Sustainability Institute? It is an EPSRC (UK’s engineering and physical science research council) funded organisation championing best practices in research software development (they are quite keen on best practice in data management as well). They have some really useful resources such as tutorials, guides to best practice and listings of the software and data carpentry training events. I wanted to draw your attention to them, because I fell that the times when archaeological simulations will need to start conforming to the painful (yet necessary) software development standards are looming upon us. The institute’s website is a great place to start.

More to the point, the Institute has just release a call for projects (see below for details). In a nutshell, the idea is that a team of research software developers (read: MacGyver meets Big-Bang-Theory) comes over and makes your code better, speeds up your simulation (e.g., by parallelising it), improves your data storage strategy, stabilises the simulation, helps with developing unit testing or version control, packs the model into an ‘out-of-the-box’ format (e.g., by developing a user-friendly interface) or whatever else you ask for that will make your code better, more sustainable, more reusable/replicable or useful for a wider community. All of that free of charge.

The open call below mentions BBSCR and ESRC, but projects funded through any UK research council (incl. AHRC and NERC), other funding bodies as well as projects based abroad are eligible to apply. The only condition is that applications “are judged on the positive potential impact on the UK research community”. The application is pretty straight forward and the call comes up twice to three times a year. The next deadline is 29th April. See below for the official call and follow the links for more details.

 

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Get help to improve your research software

If you write code as part of your research, then you can get help to improve it – free of charge – through the Software Sustainability Institute’s Open Call for Projects. The call closes on April 29 2016.

Apply at http://bit.ly/ssi-open-call-projects

You can ask for our help to improve your research software, your development practices, or your community of users and contributors (or all three!). You may want to improve the sustainability or reproducibility of your software, and need an assessment to see what to do next. Perhaps you need guidance or development effort to help improve specific aspects or make better use of infrastructure.

We accept submissions from any discipline, in relation to research software at any level of maturity, and are particularly keen to attract applications from BBSRC and ESRC funding areas.

The Software Sustainability Institute is a national facility funded by the EPSRC. Since 2010, the Institute’s Research Software Group[1] has assisted over 50 projects across all the UK Research Councils. In an ongoing survey, 93% of our previous collaborators indicated they were “very satisfied” with the results of the work. To see how we’ve helped others, you can check out our portfolio of past and current projects[2].

A typical Open Call project runs between one and six months, during which time we work with successful applicants to create and implement a tailored work plan. You can submit an application to the Open Call at any time, which only takes a few minutes, at http://bit.ly/ssi-open-call-projects.

We’re also interested in partnering on proposals. If you would like to know more about the Open Call, or explore options for partnership, please get in touch with us at info (at) software (dot) ac (dot) uk.